Bio

I am the product of clashing cultures. My father is white and my mother is black. Being bi-racial, my blended ethnicity gives me a unique perspective on society and art. Spending the first 10 years of my life in Brooklyn during the 80’s sparked my interest in graffiti and hip-hop street culture, both of which are heavy influences on my art. I use digital design, collage, spray paint and stencils to create images that invoke thought on issues such as civil rights, racial and cultural identity and politics.
My love for street art and graffiti has led me to recently work as a muralist. I started with a small outdoor painting in my own neighborhood and has that has led to larger opportunities to collaborate with corporate clients and arts organizations. Public art is important to me because it allows me to give back to the community through my talents. My goal is to transform bland or vandalized surfaces into murals that uplift and inspire the neighborhood residents. Whether is through the use of Maya Angelou quote painted on bricks or abstract shapes of color sprayed on a doorway, the idea that public art can change a space and help people feel pride in their surroundings is important to me.
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